Carl

September 2022

Carl was wandering the streets of LA and was picked up by Animal Control.  He was in pretty bad shape.  His coat was matted, he had painful foxtails imbedded in between his toes, ear infection, skin infection and a horrible upper respiratory infection.  The shelter did what they could for Carl with medication, shaved his coat and removed the foxtails.  However, there was no public interest to adopt Carl because he needed an expensive hip surgery.  

Carl’s only chance of exiting the shelter was if rescue came for him and when we found out that Carl had been lingering there for several months, we knew we were his only chance. Oddly enough, when we arrived at the shelter, there was a person in line ahead of us there for Carl, but again, Carl was turned down because of the cost of surgery.

Carl needed time to recover from his upper respiratory infection and once he did, he had his surgery.  He also had a dental at the same time and thankfully he did because foxtails were found imbedded in between his teeth!  Overall, he did well only losing a few teeth, but had he not been on antibiotics for his upper respiratory infection, his mouth could have been much worse.  

Carl has several weeks of rehabilitation ahead of him.  We are doing range of motion exercises and short walks to aid his recovery.  He is now using that leg and walking on all fours which is something he hasn’t done since coming to rescue.    

Living on the streets and shelter life took a toll on him, but thanks to WestieMed, Carl has a new lease on life!  This incredibly sweet and playful boy will now live pain free thanks to the surgery.  This is something that he probably hasn’t had in a very long time.  

Thank you WestieMed!

Karen Simondet – WROC

Lainey

Lainey was relinquished to an animal shelter because her owner was getting a divorce. Our very good friend who is the animal control deputy of the shelter alerted us to Lainey’s situation. She was listed as a 12 year old, but her microchip was registered so we had a birthdate on her. She is a precious 14.5 year old senior lady.

Lainey was covered in fleas and her backend was urine stained.  The shelter cleaned her up, treated her for fleas and we picked her up the very next day.  During the drive, she lost control of her bladder.  Once we got her home, she drank buckets and buckets of water.  Over the next 24 hours, Lainey continually drank water and urinated.  The poor little girl would also urinate while she was asleep.  It was heartbreaking and she was getting baths several times a day.

Lainey has had several vet visits in one week!  We treated her ear infections, ran her bloodwork, and urinalysis and sent it out for culture.  Her bloodwork did not have the markers for cushings, but with her extended abdomen and water consumption, we ran a dexamethasone suppression test to check for cushings syndrome.  The test did not reveal cushings, so we set up an abdominal ultrasound with an internist.  Lainey faired pretty well and does not have any masses.  One kidney shows an old blood clot so we submitted bloodwork to evaluate for evidence of hypercoagulability.  One test evaluated her overall clotting abilities which shows that she has a tendency for clot formation.  The second test evaluated for the presence of clot breakdown part which is an indirect way of saying that she is having ongoing clots in her body.  These tests tell us that Lainey is at risk for blood clots or strokes so we have started her on a blood thinner medication.    

Since Lainey’s tests have not produced a diagnosis, we are treating her for Diabetes Insipidus.  There is no test for this except by process of elimination.  We started Lainey on Desmopressin acetate which is the treatment of choice for central diabetes insipidus.  Her symptoms have dramatically improved and we are keeping a log of the amount of water she consumes.  There is room for improvement so her dosage may be adjusted.  We will continue to monitor her electrolytes and her first retest shows her electrolytes are normal so this is great news.  We have increased her medication and will retest again in 5 days.  She will also be retested for cushings down the road. 

To get Lainey to this point has been costly. But as it turns out, her owner relinquishing her to the shelter was the best thing for Lainey because she now has received the help she so desperately needed.  She already feels better and her true Westie-ness is starting to shine through!

Karen Simondet – WROC

Update September 28, 2022

Lainey continues to do well. We started Lainey on Desmopressin acetate which is the treatment of choice for central diabetes insipidus. She just had her follow up vet appointment and her prescription was refilled at the same dosage. The biggest change in her life is her new home! Lainey was adopted by Rick and Debbie and shares her home with two other westies. Her story is truly a happy beginning!

Karen Simondet – WROC

Tinkerbell

We received a text from Tink’s owner asking to surrender her to rescue because they could no longer care for her.  This little girl just turned 5 last week and had been suffering for quite some time.  Her itch is so intense that she received 3 baths in less than 24 hours of receiving her and was whisked off to our vet the very next day.   Tink has a severe case of Malassezia dermatitis which is why her skin resembles elephant’s skin.  Her ears are swollen shut, her nails were considerably overgrown, she has a heart murmur and is in need of a dental.  Poor Tink is not spayed and was bred with the owner’s other dog.  We will spay her once we get her skin under control.   Her initial vet bill was extraordinarily costly and we will incur more cost once she gets her dental and spay.

This little girl is as cute as a button and so sweet and gentle.  She has a long road of recovery and we are so thankful we have her now.  She needed us and with the help from WestieMed, this little nugget will get everything she needs.  We are committed to her health and happiness.

Karen Simondet and Kay DeLoach, WROC

Update October 28, 2021:

Tink has been in rescue for three months now and we’ve made quite a bit of progress. Her fungal and yeast infections have been eradicated, though we are still dealing with three types of bacteria. We’ve pushed out her spay and dental procedures because we do not want to do a surgery with bacteria on the skin. She is still receiving her medicated baths, every other day. The biggest change is in her personality. Though very sweet and quiet from the start, Tink has a bit of a wild side and loves to play! Now that she is feeling so much better, she exudes confidence that every little girl should own!

Karen

Update March 1, 2022:

It has been six months since Tinkerbell came to WROC and we’ve held off getting her dental and spay surgery done due to her persistent bacterial infection. However, during her recent checkup, several palpable mammary masses were discovered, so we bit the bullet and proceeded with surgery and sent out for biopsy. The good news is that the mammary tumors were benign. There was quite a bit of bleeding and her abdomen filled with fluid, so we continued with warm compresses several times a day. Turns out the surgery was the easy part. Tink suffers from Epidermal Dysplasia and though management of this condition is possible, curing it is considered impossible. Since we are unable to bathe her until her stitches come out, Tink has taken a step backward so we are doing everything we can to help control the itching until we can bathe her again. We must remain diligent in treating her to ensure long term comfort which is costly. We are so thankful to WestieMed for helping us accomplish this! In true Westie fashion, keeping Tink quiet has been a challenge! Nothing seems to phase this little girl. She is tough, resilient and lives every day to the fullest.

Karen – WROC

Update September 28, 2022

I can’t believe it’s been a year already! Tinkerbell just had her 3 month follow-up with the dermatologist specialist and though she is doing well, Dr. Werner thinks there is room for improvement. She has grown hair in her chest area, something I did not think was possible! It is sparse, but nevertheless it is an improvement. We will continue to administer 25 mg Atopica once daily, 1/4 tablet Ketoconazole 200 mg and we added 250 mg Terbinafine daily. If we don’t see a change with the Terbinafine, then we will change her anti-yeast treatment to Itraconazole. She has also been on a hydrolyzed diet this past year which is mainly for her irritable bowel disease but this also aids with her skin issues. As a last resort, the next step is allergy testing in order to formulate allergens for immunotherapy. She continues to get two medicated baths a week.

She is comfortable, happy and continues to keep Dewey in check. What a difference a year can make!

Karen

Herbert

Herbert

May 2021

Senior and special need dogs are very close to our hearts, so after losing three very special geriatric forever foster dogs within weeks of each other in April 2020, we became aware of Herbert, a 12-year[1]old Westie with chronic skin, back and leg issues and diminished eyesight. Herbert was found roaming the streets by a good Samaritan and Westie & Scottie Rescue of Houston took him in where he remained in rescue for 1 ½ years. They took fantastic care of Herbert, but with no potential adopters willing to take on Herbert’s chronic issues, the cost that goes with it and Herbert’s advanced age, we felt it was in his best interest to come to WROC as a forever foster.

Amid the pandemic, we flew to Houston to pick up Herbert and flew back to California the same day. Herbert is being treated by an ophthalmologist but unfortunately, due to the lack of care before he reached rescue, Herbert’s eyes are permanently damaged, and he will be on four eye medications, three times a day for the rest of his life. He is also being treated by our dermatologist specialist and though he no longer scratches and is comfortable, he has permanent hair loss due to damaged follicles. Along with having compressed discs in his spine, Herbert is now in need of bilateral TLPO surgery to repair his torn meniscus, torn cruciate ligament and luxating patella in both legs.

Herbert will have surgery on both legs at the same time in June with a board-certified orthopedic specialist to the tune of $9300.00. We knew going in that Herbert’s on-going medical issues would be costly, which was the reason we bought Herbert to WROC as a forever foster so that he will always get the care he needs. We can manage the irreversible damage to his eyes and skin due to previous neglect, but with Westie Med’s help, Herbert will receive surgery that will prolong quality of life, a promise we made to Herbert and all our forever fosters before him.

Thank you WestieMed!

Karen Simondet and Kay DeLoach, Westie Rescue of Orange County & Beyond

Update October 28, 2021:

It has been four months since Herbert had his bilateral TLPO surgery and what a difference it has made with his quality of life!  Herbert no longer limps and moves about very comfortably.  The surgery has also helped ease discomfort with his compressed discs in his spine.  He did gain two pounds which is a lot for a dog his size because he was on strict crate rest but now that he has recently been given the okay to resume his daily walks, we are working on walking off the extra pounds. 

Our little big Texan dog at heart is living the dream!

We owe WestieMed a huge thank you for helping Herbert live his very best life.

Karen

Update September 28, 2022

Our little big Texan is doing quite well since his bilateral TLPO surgery. it’s been a little over a year now and Herbert walks with ease. We noticed occasional limping and had him looked at by his surgeon and as suspected, he is feeling the effects of normal osteoarthritis. We are treating him with gabapentin and rimadyl as needed. The exciting news is that his dry eye has improved considerably. He just had his six month follow up with the ophthalmologist and his tear production went from 09 mm in both eyes to 22 mm since we changed his medication dosage and from drops to ointment. He is now on 0.03% Tacrolimus ointment, 2% Cyclosporine ointment, and Neo-polydex twice a day. The Optixcare Ophthalmic gel several times a day helps keep his eyes lubricated in between medications.

Herbert is a happy boy. He loves his routine, his favorite bed and his walks around the neighborhood and continues to try and lure us into the kitchen where he thinks all the magic happens.

Karen